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Archive for the ‘Backup’ Category



Many questions abound in various discussions about cloud services.  How fast must the disk be?  How big must the server be?  It is interesting that these questions mimic those of traditional in-house (localized datacenter) architecture.  Or is it?  Has the myopic nature of silo based organizational IT structure permeated the cloud?  Unfortunately, yes (http://blog.engagedconsulting.com/?p=234).

As part of a recent discussion on the subject, a topic was put forth as “NAS Cloud with Solid State Drives: Is there any advantage of using SSD over SATA, SAS, FC, ISCI when it comes to doing cloud over NAS? Any Performance numbers published on same?” A few responded with varying levels of inquiry to the requirements while also indicating the fact that IOPS (I/O per second) was not the real issue when considering what disk was appropriate for cloud storage.  The discussion went further…..

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How is an organization doing?  Is it structured appropriately?  Do the people have the right skills?  Are there hindrances to attaining organizational goals?  What hurdles exist in employee satisfaction?  Does the market recognize the organization of note?  All of these are great questions to answer when looking to understand what the current state of an organization is.  However, many pundits would say that the only judge of an organization are its people.  That is debatable.

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Lets consider, if you will, that there are multiple layers of Enterprise Architecture. One aspect is the business aspect. Another aspect is divisional aspect.

The basic premise of people, process, and enablement applies in either case. I would agree with the argument that organizations worldwide have lost the art of Enterprise Architecture as is obvious by the numerous structures and departments littered across the landscape of business today. Even more substantial is the structure of governmental bodies proliferating the map (i.e. take IT – 27 CIOs for one department of the US Government). Read the rest of this entry »

There are multiple ways to look at recovery time objectives (RTO – how much time we can be without) and recovery point objetives (RPO – how much we can afford to lose). If we look at it from a top (business level) down (IT level), there would be a similar concept to a simple criticality rating that may be indicated that eliminates portions of data (that support business functions) that are not “critical” and some that stays critical that would flow from the following elements:

  • Business Impact Analysis (BIA) that identifies business risk
  • Business Continuity Plan (BCP) that outlines recovery of business function (including IT as a business unit – mangement structure, procurement, etc.)
    • Recovery Point and Time Objectives for BC (Business Continuity)
  • Disaster Recovery Plan (DRP) for the recovery of technology to support the deemed critical business functions outlined in the BCP
    • Recovery Point and Time Objectives for DR (Disaster Recovery)
  • Application Matrix for coorelation between physical infrastructure with application functionality
    • Single Points of Failure for application matrix
  • Synchronization requirements for multiple data stores to eliminate corruption (i.e. different time stamps or multiple access point for shared data)

This describes how any Backup (Operational Recovery as I like to call it) system supports the business in the event of disaster and are longer due to the massive effort to focus on recovery of entire business unit(s), business location(s), and/or data center(s). One important item to note: backup / operational recovery is _not_ disaster recovery; however, every good disaster recovery plan has backup / operational recovery in it. So, this is one perspective of RTO / RPO, and it is separate from what is needed from a day to day or operational perspective. This is why I like to call it operational recovery. Read the rest of this entry »

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