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Archive for the ‘Development’ Category

How is an organization doing?  Is it structured appropriately?  Do the people have the right skills?  Are there hindrances to attaining organizational goals?  What hurdles exist in employee satisfaction?  Does the market recognize the organization of note?  All of these are great questions to answer when looking to understand what the current state of an organization is.  However, many pundits would say that the only judge of an organization are its people.  That is debatable.

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Lets consider, if you will, that there are multiple layers of Enterprise Architecture. One aspect is the business aspect. Another aspect is divisional aspect.

The basic premise of people, process, and enablement applies in either case. I would agree with the argument that organizations worldwide have lost the art of Enterprise Architecture as is obvious by the numerous structures and departments littered across the landscape of business today. Even more substantial is the structure of governmental bodies proliferating the map (i.e. take IT – 27 CIOs for one department of the US Government). Read the rest of this entry »

There are multiple ways to look at recovery time objectives (RTO – how much time we can be without) and recovery point objetives (RPO – how much we can afford to lose). If we look at it from a top (business level) down (IT level), there would be a similar concept to a simple criticality rating that may be indicated that eliminates portions of data (that support business functions) that are not “critical” and some that stays critical that would flow from the following elements:

  • Business Impact Analysis (BIA) that identifies business risk
  • Business Continuity Plan (BCP) that outlines recovery of business function (including IT as a business unit – mangement structure, procurement, etc.)
    • Recovery Point and Time Objectives for BC (Business Continuity)
  • Disaster Recovery Plan (DRP) for the recovery of technology to support the deemed critical business functions outlined in the BCP
    • Recovery Point and Time Objectives for DR (Disaster Recovery)
  • Application Matrix for coorelation between physical infrastructure with application functionality
    • Single Points of Failure for application matrix
  • Synchronization requirements for multiple data stores to eliminate corruption (i.e. different time stamps or multiple access point for shared data)

This describes how any Backup (Operational Recovery as I like to call it) system supports the business in the event of disaster and are longer due to the massive effort to focus on recovery of entire business unit(s), business location(s), and/or data center(s). One important item to note: backup / operational recovery is _not_ disaster recovery; however, every good disaster recovery plan has backup / operational recovery in it. So, this is one perspective of RTO / RPO, and it is separate from what is needed from a day to day or operational perspective. This is why I like to call it operational recovery. Read the rest of this entry »

I recently read the following blog article by Nicole Blake Johnson (http://t.co/2Yr0Sqq) and about fell out of my chair.  I see it time and again throughout many government and commercial enterprises.  Organizations that are way out of whack.  How can an enterprise be any where near efficient, agile, cost effective, rigorous, and results oriented with so many layers of bureaucracy?  27 different CIOs and 10 Deputy CIOs for the same governmental department?  Really?  Seems like a lot of redundancy, overlapping responsibility, conflicting strategies, complexity, contradictory standards, and excessive cost.  No wonder many are skeptical of IT. Read the rest of this entry »

I was recently following a discussion on LinkedIn about what Law Firm staff should do to help IT. There were many responses over a period of three months.  One response likened IT to fire fighters and staffers to arsonists (LOL – Ben Schorr).  Ironically, the specificity of law is not unique to this problem.  Legal firms have their own life-cycle and cadence that is certainly unique.  The problem of communication and integration of IT and business is worldwide and ubiquitous in all industries. Read the rest of this entry »

There have been many Interesting comments discussions about Cloud Computing over the last year.  In fact, many have predicted that Cloud Computing has the same goal as Pinky and the Brain (Pinky asks Brain, “what are we going to do tonight?” The Brain answers, “The same thing we do every night, Pinky. Take over the world!”).  The issue of what is “cloud computing” is extremely relevant as every vendor in the world is trying to spin it unique to them. Ownership of assets is not necessarily what the “cloud” is about. Unfortunately, technology is required to send and receive content; thus, elimination of assets via the cloud is a mirage. Read the rest of this entry »

For years, the IT industry has been experiencing growth in outsourcing.  Organizations large and small have looked to utilize the promises of lower cost of operation.  Witnessing this trend over time has allowed me to see something emerge that I have long held as truth.  Users have a responsibility to be accountable.  Accountable to the service that they have contracted for, the information provided, the knowledge of the ownership of information, the recoverability,  the usage, and the measurement against established criteria to name a few.  Cloud is no different.  I like to say, “You cannot manage that which you do not measure, and you cannot measure that which you do not know about”.  Nonetheless, countless organizations dive into contracting for a service at one level and demand the service of the levels above that which they have contracted for. Read the rest of this entry »

If most everyone agrees that information, not data ( http://blog.engagedconsulting.com/?p=268 ),  is critical to the health of a business, why does information not get protected in accordance with this importance?  Cost containment is absolutely important ( http://blog.engagedconsulting.com/?p=356 ), but at the feet of enormous risk? I have seen  a lot of robbing Peter to pay Paul in enterprise environments big and small throughout my years; however, it seems to be getting worse instead of better.  For instance, one organization prioritizes their financial databases as mission critical.  In so doing, the operational recovery (backup) solution was designed with deduplication.  Sounds fundamental, right? Read the rest of this entry »

Much debate has occurred over the priority order of information confidentiality, availability, or integrity.  Which one is more important than the other? It depends. Typical consultative answer right? You cannot blindly say which is more important.  The business situation changes the priorities, albeit minor in altitude.  Not all information is created equal; thus, we cannot blatantly say that it should be treated with the utmost availability, integrity, or confidentiality. Read the rest of this entry »

OK. This post is a bit different than the usual topics I would write about, but it’s one that I feel is worth addressing. On Twitter, there is a (loosely honored) tradition called “Follow Friday”, where you call out the people that you think are worth others following (in case you don’t do Twitter, that is the same as subscribing to a persons “tweets” or messages, OK?). Well, earlier today, I sent a tweet which said:

I am *so* close to unfollowing a few folks for pushing out the same tired, crappy tweets over and over again.

I am about to start a new (loosely honored) tradition of my own called “Unfollow Friday”… complete with it’s own hashtag (#UFF).

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