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Posts Tagged ‘Capacity Management’

Indeed, backup (or as I like to call it, operational recovery) continues to grow in criticality and priority (i.e. mobile data – http://searchcio.techtarget.com/news/2240022995/Mobile-data-security-spans-policies-budgets-and-backups ? ).   Still few understand the differences between it, disaster recovery, and business continuity ( http://blog.engagedconsulting.com/?p=162 ).

  Nonetheless, operational recovery remains extremely pertinent.

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Cloud Computing makes Enterprise Architecture more important & supremely relevant. Enterprise Architecture is not a cookie cutter approach which has the same duck shape for children, large circle for adults, and guitar heroes for teenagers. Enterprise Architecture will use Cloud Computing as an arrow in the quiver, if you will.

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Storage Management is only viable with visibility.  Visibility takes many different forms: business volume, database volume, legal discovery volume, infrastructure volume (server, storage, network, etc.), marketing volume, business intelligence volume, and so forth. You cannot manage that which you do not monitor, and you cannot monitor that which you are unaware of. While DFS and hardware thin provisioning are good tactical solutions, they are only covering the root cause, ineffective or no Enterprise Capacity Planning ( http://blog.engagedconsulting.com/?p=54 ).

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Disaster Recovery and Business Continuity are completely different. They are siblings but still two separate and unique topics. Disaster Recovery is technology + process + people for IT systems. Business continuity is people + process for business functions. You can have Business Continuity without Disaster Recovery. The opposite is a total waste of money. If there is no plan for the business to recover and connect to IT systems, you are pouring money down the drain.

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 It is ironic that this is a debate with some business leaders! IT, by its very nature and existence, is automation. However, without proper process, automation fails to hit the mark. Efficiency and time to market are the cornerstones of competition at a pure business level. Thus, automation is not simply a nice to have but a elemental component of business.

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Centralization of IT is definitely a good start in cost savings; however, it is not, by any means, all that it is cracked up to be without a vision for the future with an architecture to match. What kind of savings were realized by decommissioning systems, applications, and common infrastructure components? These will be minimal in context to the true sharing of resources to provide standardized, commoditized, and meaningful service levels (platinum, gold, silver, etc.). A utility model is a blast from the past but still viable. Cloud computing, at its very root, is a derivative of utility computing.
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Enterprise Capacity Planning is a program which epitomizes the adage, “the whole is greater than the sum of the parts”.  Too often we look at capacity management myopically. We focus on a particular portion of the environment (i.e. storage, network, server, etc.). Enterprise capacity planning, on the other hand, encompasses all of the elements of the environment, including HVAC, power, floor space, and the like. Therefore, we must also understand our loads, pipeline for the future, and end of life components.

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