Helpful Tips
Get to the information you want quicker by selecting a category name or a popular tag.

Posts Tagged ‘Efficiency’

Technology is not a Plan.  Technology enables a Plan.  A Plan coordinates the people and processes that are then enabled by the technology.  A replication package only “copies” (I realize it does more than copy, but for simplification purposes that’s what we will call it) bits from one location to another one.  How do you decide what to replicate?  How do you decide whether there is corruption?  How do you handle a hardware failure on one or both of the arrays which are involved in the replication during a disaster?  Who declares disaster?  Who makes the decision to purchase an array, if necessary?  How do you communicate between team members if cell phones and land lines are down?  Where do you go to connect if the normal location is inaccessible (blocked off by police, etc.)? Read the rest of this entry »

All too often, organizations that do have Business Continuity Plans (BCP) in place rarely test them.  Those that do, go through a typical tabletop exercise.  Organizations that have Disaster Recovery Plans (DRP) generally test them, but why?  I ask why because it has been my experience that the “tests” are an exercise in futility.  I say futility because they are tests to satisfy an audit that prove very little. Read the rest of this entry »

Read the rest of this entry »

Investors’ confidence in corporate America has been shaken to the core, affecting the culture in which we live at the most basic level— for we are all investors in one way or another. Regulations governing information policy, process, and recovery are continuing to litter the radar screen of business strategy. It may be a leap of faith to see the correlation between regulations, whether civil or criminal; however, it is not as clear when comparing human resources issues and corporate governance issues. However, it will become clear that the correlation lies in the approaches organizations must take to comply with and survive an audit of human resources issues such as Equal Employment Opportunity and corporate governance issues such as Sarbanes- Oxley. Read the rest of this entry »

Simplistically, data and information are related but not the same.  Just for the sake of this discussion, lets define data as bits, bytes, and types of files; whereas, information is the value to the organization in terms of usage (i.e. customer records, financial records, intellectual property, personal identifiable information (pii), executive communication, etc.).  As the need for storage of data and information continues to escalate, organizations must look to classify information.  Many industry experts might even say it is a critical step to survival, if not simply transformation.  Multiple strategic components of an overall IT strategy depend upon Information Classification such as cyber security, data loss prevention, and so on.  Thus, Information does have a lifecycle. Read the rest of this entry »

Organizations struggle with the disconnect that seems to exist between the business and IT.  Recently, I read an article that espoused the concept of the business unit “owning” the IT resources because traditional IT was too slow, cumbersome, and often a road block.  The expanse that exists between IT and the Business is more a function of society than anything.  Technical people and non-technical people do not tend to flock together.  Additionally, IT has had its flaws (http://blog.engagedconsulting.com/?p=234).  The answer, I believe, is somewhere in between.

Read the rest of this entry »

Solving the incident / problem management quandary has many different perspectives. Education, automation, and knowledge management continue to bubble to the top as elements to resolve the number of incidents; however, the chain to resolution must be analyzed. This chain is not simply looking at what resolved that particular incident and problem. There must be a completion or recognition of the same ground covered so that the fundamental flaw of IT does not appear (http://blog.engagedconsulting.com/?p234).

Read the rest of this entry »

Indeed, backup (or as I like to call it, operational recovery) continues to grow in criticality and priority (i.e. mobile data – http://searchcio.techtarget.com/news/2240022995/Mobile-data-security-spans-policies-budgets-and-backups ? ).   Still few understand the differences between it, disaster recovery, and business continuity ( http://blog.engagedconsulting.com/?p=162 ).

  Nonetheless, operational recovery remains extremely pertinent.

Read the rest of this entry »

Ironically, one of the best mechanisms for organizing and managing an IT organization is its fundamental flaw as well.  Organizing IT in silos such as server, storage, network, security, service management, project management, or development groups has driven a behavior that has proven to be detrimental to the over all health of the organization itself.

Read the rest of this entry »

I struggle with the implication that technology (a product or collection thereof) solves a problem.
Read the rest of this entry »

Close
loading...