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Posts Tagged ‘IT supply chain’

I recently had the pleasure of engaging with a great group of folks on the itSMF Rocky Mountain Local Interest Group (LIG) on Green IT.

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What ROI does the CIO provide the business?  What is the next step for the CIO?  What is the evolutionary development path for IT?  All of these are daunting questions to which many have opinions and thoughts.  So, let me give my two cents.  Business and IT Alignment is necessary.  The CIO must play a significant role in this, not to mention develop beyond the role that he/she has been fulfilling for the last few decades within business and organizational constructs. In so doing, the elements of risk management, due diligence, and efficiency reverberate throughout most of the comments and thoughts that are going through your head at this very instant.  Not to mention the ironic and funny coincidence that a Chief Information Officer and a Chief Investment Officer both share the same acronym and, albeit abstract, similar function. Read the rest of this entry »

Simplistically, data and information are related but not the same.  Just for the sake of this discussion, lets define data as bits, bytes, and types of files; whereas, information is the value to the organization in terms of usage (i.e. customer records, financial records, intellectual property, personal identifiable information (pii), executive communication, etc.).  As the need for storage of data and information continues to escalate, organizations must look to classify information.  Many industry experts might even say it is a critical step to survival, if not simply transformation.  Multiple strategic components of an overall IT strategy depend upon Information Classification such as cyber security, data loss prevention, and so on.  Thus, Information does have a lifecycle. Read the rest of this entry »

Organizations struggle with the disconnect that seems to exist between the business and IT.  Recently, I read an article that espoused the concept of the business unit “owning” the IT resources because traditional IT was too slow, cumbersome, and often a road block.  The expanse that exists between IT and the Business is more a function of society than anything.  Technical people and non-technical people do not tend to flock together.  Additionally, IT has had its flaws (http://blog.engagedconsulting.com/?p=234).  The answer, I believe, is somewhere in between.

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Solving the incident / problem management quandary has many different perspectives. Education, automation, and knowledge management continue to bubble to the top as elements to resolve the number of incidents; however, the chain to resolution must be analyzed. This chain is not simply looking at what resolved that particular incident and problem. There must be a completion or recognition of the same ground covered so that the fundamental flaw of IT does not appear (http://blog.engagedconsulting.com/?p234).

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Indeed, backup (or as I like to call it, operational recovery) continues to grow in criticality and priority (i.e. mobile data – http://searchcio.techtarget.com/news/2240022995/Mobile-data-security-spans-policies-budgets-and-backups ? ).   Still few understand the differences between it, disaster recovery, and business continuity ( http://blog.engagedconsulting.com/?p=162 ).

  Nonetheless, operational recovery remains extremely pertinent.

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Ironically, one of the best mechanisms for organizing and managing an IT organization is its fundamental flaw as well.  Organizing IT in silos such as server, storage, network, security, service management, project management, or development groups has driven a behavior that has proven to be detrimental to the over all health of the organization itself.

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I struggle with the implication that technology (a product or collection thereof) solves a problem.
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The process of information classification is a necessary evil in today’s enterprises. It is necessary to prevent data loss in any form or fashion, malicious or not. The process, if done correctly, is not trivial. The actual determination of classes is only the beginning. Applying it to an existing environment can be daunting. However, the transformation of an organization depends upon successful completion.
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Cloud Computing makes Enterprise Architecture more important & supremely relevant. Enterprise Architecture is not a cookie cutter approach which has the same duck shape for children, large circle for adults, and guitar heroes for teenagers. Enterprise Architecture will use Cloud Computing as an arrow in the quiver, if you will.

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