Helpful Tips
Get to the information you want quicker by selecting a category name or a popular tag.

Posts Tagged ‘Organizational Development’

All too often, organizations that do have Business Continuity Plans (BCP) in place rarely test them.  Those that do, go through a typical tabletop exercise.  Organizations that have Disaster Recovery Plans (DRP) generally test them, but why?  I ask why because it has been my experience that the “tests” are an exercise in futility.  I say futility because they are tests to satisfy an audit that prove very little. Read the rest of this entry »

Read the rest of this entry »

In the November 5, 2010 issue of Processor magazine, there is an article titled “Building the Data Center Staff” where I am quoted on behalf of Engaged Consulting. It’s great to again have the opportunity to be talking about a topic that is absolutely critical to our customers — how to hire the best people to build out their teams. Having been a hiring manager (still am, actually) in large and small firms, I am all too aware of the importance of making good hiring decisions.  Unfortunately, just “going through the motions” that most companies specify as part of the hiring process, won’t get you all the way there. In fact, it may only get you far enough to cause problems.

Read the rest of this entry »

Investors’ confidence in corporate America has been shaken to the core, affecting the culture in which we live at the most basic level— for we are all investors in one way or another. Regulations governing information policy, process, and recovery are continuing to litter the radar screen of business strategy. It may be a leap of faith to see the correlation between regulations, whether civil or criminal; however, it is not as clear when comparing human resources issues and corporate governance issues. However, it will become clear that the correlation lies in the approaches organizations must take to comply with and survive an audit of human resources issues such as Equal Employment Opportunity and corporate governance issues such as Sarbanes- Oxley. Read the rest of this entry »

Organizations struggle with the disconnect that seems to exist between the business and IT.  Recently, I read an article that espoused the concept of the business unit “owning” the IT resources because traditional IT was too slow, cumbersome, and often a road block.  The expanse that exists between IT and the Business is more a function of society than anything.  Technical people and non-technical people do not tend to flock together.  Additionally, IT has had its flaws (http://blog.engagedconsulting.com/?p=234).  The answer, I believe, is somewhere in between.

Read the rest of this entry »

Solving the incident / problem management quandary has many different perspectives. Education, automation, and knowledge management continue to bubble to the top as elements to resolve the number of incidents; however, the chain to resolution must be analyzed. This chain is not simply looking at what resolved that particular incident and problem. There must be a completion or recognition of the same ground covered so that the fundamental flaw of IT does not appear (http://blog.engagedconsulting.com/?p234).

Read the rest of this entry »

Indeed, backup (or as I like to call it, operational recovery) continues to grow in criticality and priority (i.e. mobile data – http://searchcio.techtarget.com/news/2240022995/Mobile-data-security-spans-policies-budgets-and-backups ? ).   Still few understand the differences between it, disaster recovery, and business continuity ( http://blog.engagedconsulting.com/?p=162 ).

  Nonetheless, operational recovery remains extremely pertinent.

Read the rest of this entry »

Ironically, one of the best mechanisms for organizing and managing an IT organization is its fundamental flaw as well.  Organizing IT in silos such as server, storage, network, security, service management, project management, or development groups has driven a behavior that has proven to be detrimental to the over all health of the organization itself.

Read the rest of this entry »

I struggle with the implication that technology (a product or collection thereof) solves a problem.
Read the rest of this entry »

Close
loading...