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Posts Tagged ‘Return on Investment’

I recently had the pleasure of engaging with a great group of folks on the itSMF Rocky Mountain Local Interest Group (LIG) on Green IT.

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Technology is not a Plan.  Technology enables a Plan.  A Plan coordinates the people and processes that are then enabled by the technology.  A replication package only “copies” (I realize it does more than copy, but for simplification purposes that’s what we will call it) bits from one location to another one.  How do you decide what to replicate?  How do you decide whether there is corruption?  How do you handle a hardware failure on one or both of the arrays which are involved in the replication during a disaster?  Who declares disaster?  Who makes the decision to purchase an array, if necessary?  How do you communicate between team members if cell phones and land lines are down?  Where do you go to connect if the normal location is inaccessible (blocked off by police, etc.)? Read the rest of this entry »

What ROI does the CIO provide the business?  What is the next step for the CIO?  What is the evolutionary development path for IT?  All of these are daunting questions to which many have opinions and thoughts.  So, let me give my two cents.  Business and IT Alignment is necessary.  The CIO must play a significant role in this, not to mention develop beyond the role that he/she has been fulfilling for the last few decades within business and organizational constructs. In so doing, the elements of risk management, due diligence, and efficiency reverberate throughout most of the comments and thoughts that are going through your head at this very instant.  Not to mention the ironic and funny coincidence that a Chief Information Officer and a Chief Investment Officer both share the same acronym and, albeit abstract, similar function. Read the rest of this entry »

All too often, organizations that do have Business Continuity Plans (BCP) in place rarely test them.  Those that do, go through a typical tabletop exercise.  Organizations that have Disaster Recovery Plans (DRP) generally test them, but why?  I ask why because it has been my experience that the “tests” are an exercise in futility.  I say futility because they are tests to satisfy an audit that prove very little. Read the rest of this entry »

Organizations struggle with the disconnect that seems to exist between the business and IT.  Recently, I read an article that espoused the concept of the business unit “owning” the IT resources because traditional IT was too slow, cumbersome, and often a road block.  The expanse that exists between IT and the Business is more a function of society than anything.  Technical people and non-technical people do not tend to flock together.  Additionally, IT has had its flaws (http://blog.engagedconsulting.com/?p=234).  The answer, I believe, is somewhere in between.

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Indeed, backup (or as I like to call it, operational recovery) continues to grow in criticality and priority (i.e. mobile data – http://searchcio.techtarget.com/news/2240022995/Mobile-data-security-spans-policies-budgets-and-backups ? ).   Still few understand the differences between it, disaster recovery, and business continuity ( http://blog.engagedconsulting.com/?p=162 ).

  Nonetheless, operational recovery remains extremely pertinent.

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Ironically, one of the best mechanisms for organizing and managing an IT organization is its fundamental flaw as well.  Organizing IT in silos such as server, storage, network, security, service management, project management, or development groups has driven a behavior that has proven to be detrimental to the over all health of the organization itself.

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The process of information classification is a necessary evil in today’s enterprises. It is necessary to prevent data loss in any form or fashion, malicious or not. The process, if done correctly, is not trivial. The actual determination of classes is only the beginning. Applying it to an existing environment can be daunting. However, the transformation of an organization depends upon successful completion.
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Cloud Computing makes Enterprise Architecture more important & supremely relevant. Enterprise Architecture is not a cookie cutter approach which has the same duck shape for children, large circle for adults, and guitar heroes for teenagers. Enterprise Architecture will use Cloud Computing as an arrow in the quiver, if you will.

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Storage Management is only viable with visibility.  Visibility takes many different forms: business volume, database volume, legal discovery volume, infrastructure volume (server, storage, network, etc.), marketing volume, business intelligence volume, and so forth. You cannot manage that which you do not monitor, and you cannot monitor that which you are unaware of. While DFS and hardware thin provisioning are good tactical solutions, they are only covering the root cause, ineffective or no Enterprise Capacity Planning ( http://blog.engagedconsulting.com/?p=54 ).

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