Helpful Tips
Get to the information you want quicker by selecting a category name or a popular tag.

Posts Tagged ‘Storage Resource Management’



Many questions abound in various discussions about cloud services.  How fast must the disk be?  How big must the server be?  It is interesting that these questions mimic those of traditional in-house (localized datacenter) architecture.  Or is it?  Has the myopic nature of silo based organizational IT structure permeated the cloud?  Unfortunately, yes (http://blog.engagedconsulting.com/?p=234).

As part of a recent discussion on the subject, a topic was put forth as “NAS Cloud with Solid State Drives: Is there any advantage of using SSD over SATA, SAS, FC, ISCI when it comes to doing cloud over NAS? Any Performance numbers published on same?” A few responded with varying levels of inquiry to the requirements while also indicating the fact that IOPS (I/O per second) was not the real issue when considering what disk was appropriate for cloud storage.  The discussion went further…..

Read the rest of this entry »

How is an organization doing?  Is it structured appropriately?  Do the people have the right skills?  Are there hindrances to attaining organizational goals?  What hurdles exist in employee satisfaction?  Does the market recognize the organization of note?  All of these are great questions to answer when looking to understand what the current state of an organization is.  However, many pundits would say that the only judge of an organization are its people.  That is debatable.

Read the rest of this entry »

Lets consider, if you will, that there are multiple layers of Enterprise Architecture. One aspect is the business aspect. Another aspect is divisional aspect.

The basic premise of people, process, and enablement applies in either case. I would agree with the argument that organizations worldwide have lost the art of Enterprise Architecture as is obvious by the numerous structures and departments littered across the landscape of business today. Even more substantial is the structure of governmental bodies proliferating the map (i.e. take IT – 27 CIOs for one department of the US Government). Read the rest of this entry »

Deduplication is certainly a hot topic! I have seen many great discussions about deduplication in many different forums. Many of the discussions center around technical specifications.  Unfortunately, this is not a new phenomenon.  Technical specifications address the applicability of a particular product to a range of uses, sometimes broad but more often narrow in focus.  Deduplication has grown out of many different needs in the industry.  The greatest of these is cost reduction.  Cost reduction in storage, backup, network, and protection (lumping information security with data loss prevention and the like). Read the rest of this entry »

Much debate has occurred over the priority order of information confidentiality, availability, or integrity.  Which one is more important than the other? It depends. Typical consultative answer right? You cannot blindly say which is more important.  The business situation changes the priorities, albeit minor in altitude.  Not all information is created equal; thus, we cannot blatantly say that it should be treated with the utmost availability, integrity, or confidentiality. Read the rest of this entry »

Simplistically, data and information are related but not the same.  Just for the sake of this discussion, lets define data as bits, bytes, and types of files; whereas, information is the value to the organization in terms of usage (i.e. customer records, financial records, intellectual property, personal identifiable information (pii), executive communication, etc.).  As the need for storage of data and information continues to escalate, organizations must look to classify information.  Many industry experts might even say it is a critical step to survival, if not simply transformation.  Multiple strategic components of an overall IT strategy depend upon Information Classification such as cyber security, data loss prevention, and so on.  Thus, Information does have a lifecycle. Read the rest of this entry »

The process of information classification is a necessary evil in today’s enterprises. It is necessary to prevent data loss in any form or fashion, malicious or not. The process, if done correctly, is not trivial. The actual determination of classes is only the beginning. Applying it to an existing environment can be daunting. However, the transformation of an organization depends upon successful completion.
Read the rest of this entry »

Storage Management is only viable with visibility.  Visibility takes many different forms: business volume, database volume, legal discovery volume, infrastructure volume (server, storage, network, etc.), marketing volume, business intelligence volume, and so forth. You cannot manage that which you do not monitor, and you cannot monitor that which you are unaware of. While DFS and hardware thin provisioning are good tactical solutions, they are only covering the root cause, ineffective or no Enterprise Capacity Planning ( http://blog.engagedconsulting.com/?p=54 ).

Read the rest of this entry »

Disaster Recovery and Business Continuity are completely different. They are siblings but still two separate and unique topics. Disaster Recovery is technology + process + people for IT systems. Business continuity is people + process for business functions. You can have Business Continuity without Disaster Recovery. The opposite is a total waste of money. If there is no plan for the business to recover and connect to IT systems, you are pouring money down the drain.

Read the rest of this entry »

Centralization of IT is definitely a good start in cost savings; however, it is not, by any means, all that it is cracked up to be without a vision for the future with an architecture to match. What kind of savings were realized by decommissioning systems, applications, and common infrastructure components? These will be minimal in context to the true sharing of resources to provide standardized, commoditized, and meaningful service levels (platinum, gold, silver, etc.). A utility model is a blast from the past but still viable. Cloud computing, at its very root, is a derivative of utility computing.
Read the rest of this entry »

Close
loading...