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Posts Tagged ‘Vendors’

There have been many Interesting comments discussions about Cloud Computing over the last year.  In fact, many have predicted that Cloud Computing has the same goal as Pinky and the Brain (Pinky asks Brain, “what are we going to do tonight?” The Brain answers, “The same thing we do every night, Pinky. Take over the world!”).  The issue of what is “cloud computing” is extremely relevant as every vendor in the world is trying to spin it unique to them. Ownership of assets is not necessarily what the “cloud” is about. Unfortunately, technology is required to send and receive content; thus, elimination of assets via the cloud is a mirage. Read the rest of this entry »

For years, the IT industry has been experiencing growth in outsourcing.  Organizations large and small have looked to utilize the promises of lower cost of operation.  Witnessing this trend over time has allowed me to see something emerge that I have long held as truth.  Users have a responsibility to be accountable.  Accountable to the service that they have contracted for, the information provided, the knowledge of the ownership of information, the recoverability,  the usage, and the measurement against established criteria to name a few.  Cloud is no different.  I like to say, “You cannot manage that which you do not measure, and you cannot measure that which you do not know about”.  Nonetheless, countless organizations dive into contracting for a service at one level and demand the service of the levels above that which they have contracted for. Read the rest of this entry »

Deduplication is certainly a hot topic! I have seen many great discussions about deduplication in many different forums. Many of the discussions center around technical specifications.  Unfortunately, this is not a new phenomenon.  Technical specifications address the applicability of a particular product to a range of uses, sometimes broad but more often narrow in focus.  Deduplication has grown out of many different needs in the industry.  The greatest of these is cost reduction.  Cost reduction in storage, backup, network, and protection (lumping information security with data loss prevention and the like). Read the rest of this entry »

Technology is not a Plan.  Technology enables a Plan.  A Plan coordinates the people and processes that are then enabled by the technology.  A replication package only “copies” (I realize it does more than copy, but for simplification purposes that’s what we will call it) bits from one location to another one.  How do you decide what to replicate?  How do you decide whether there is corruption?  How do you handle a hardware failure on one or both of the arrays which are involved in the replication during a disaster?  Who declares disaster?  Who makes the decision to purchase an array, if necessary?  How do you communicate between team members if cell phones and land lines are down?  Where do you go to connect if the normal location is inaccessible (blocked off by police, etc.)? Read the rest of this entry »

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Simplistically, data and information are related but not the same.  Just for the sake of this discussion, lets define data as bits, bytes, and types of files; whereas, information is the value to the organization in terms of usage (i.e. customer records, financial records, intellectual property, personal identifiable information (pii), executive communication, etc.).  As the need for storage of data and information continues to escalate, organizations must look to classify information.  Many industry experts might even say it is a critical step to survival, if not simply transformation.  Multiple strategic components of an overall IT strategy depend upon Information Classification such as cyber security, data loss prevention, and so on.  Thus, Information does have a lifecycle. Read the rest of this entry »

Indeed, backup (or as I like to call it, operational recovery) continues to grow in criticality and priority (i.e. mobile data – http://searchcio.techtarget.com/news/2240022995/Mobile-data-security-spans-policies-budgets-and-backups ? ).   Still few understand the differences between it, disaster recovery, and business continuity ( http://blog.engagedconsulting.com/?p=162 ).

  Nonetheless, operational recovery remains extremely pertinent.

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I struggle with the implication that technology (a product or collection thereof) solves a problem.
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Disaster Recovery and Business Continuity are completely different. They are siblings but still two separate and unique topics. Disaster Recovery is technology + process + people for IT systems. Business continuity is people + process for business functions. You can have Business Continuity without Disaster Recovery. The opposite is a total waste of money. If there is no plan for the business to recover and connect to IT systems, you are pouring money down the drain.

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Enterprise Capacity Planning is a program which epitomizes the adage, “the whole is greater than the sum of the parts”.  Too often we look at capacity management myopically. We focus on a particular portion of the environment (i.e. storage, network, server, etc.). Enterprise capacity planning, on the other hand, encompasses all of the elements of the environment, including HVAC, power, floor space, and the like. Therefore, we must also understand our loads, pipeline for the future, and end of life components.

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